Wed Sep 6, 2017 06:12PM
People carry the body of Muhammad Mansour recovered from under the rubble of a house destroyed by a Saudi airstrike in Sana’a, Yemen, on August 25, 2017. (Photos by Reuters)
People carry the body of Muhammad Mansour recovered from under the rubble of a house destroyed by a Saudi airstrike in Sana’a, Yemen, on August 25, 2017. (Photos by Reuters)

At least five civilians have been killed when Saudi military aircraft carried out an airstrike against a residential area in Yemen as the Saudi regime presses ahead with an atrocious military campaign against its crisis-hit southern neighbor.

Local sources, speaking on condition of anonymity, said five people lost their lives and as many sustained injuries on Wednesday, when Saudi fighter jets bombarded a residential building in al-Sadat village of Hayran district in the northwestern province of Hajjah, Arabic-language al-Masirah satellite television network reported.  

The source added that the airstrike also inflicted damage to adjacent buildings in the targeted area.

Later in the day, Yemeni army soldiers, backed by allied fighters from Popular Committees, thwarted an infiltration attempt by Saudi-sponsored mercenaries into Wadi al-Safra region in the south-central Yemeni province of Shabwah, killing 10 of them.

Saudi Arabia has been incessantly pounding Yemen since March 2015 in an attempt to crush the popular Houthi Ansarullah movement and reinstate the former president, Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi, who is a staunch ally of the Riyadh regime.

More than 12,000 people have been killed since the onset of the campaign more than two and a half years ago. Much of the Arabian Peninsula country's infrastructure, including hospitals, schools and factories, has been reduced to rubble due the war.

The Saudi war has also triggered a deadly cholera epidemic across Yemen.

Mourners use mud to cover bodies inside a grave during the funeral of eight family members killed by a Saudi airstrike in Sana’a, Yemen, on August 26, 2017. 

According to data provided by the World Health Organization and Yemen’s Health Ministry, the country’s cholera outbreak, the worst on record in terms of its rapid spread, has infected 612,703 people and killed 2,048 since it began in April, with some districts still reporting sharp rises in new cases.

The United Nations says the Saudi war has left some 17 million Yemenis hungry, nearly seven million facing famine, and about 16 million almost without access to water or sanitation.

The United States and Britain have been providing the bulk of the military ordnance used by Saudi Arabia in the war. London has licensed 3.3 billion pounds worth of weapons since the beginning of the war.

Washington also sealed a multibillion-dollar arms deal with Riyadh when US President Donald Trump made his maiden visit abroad in May. The deal, which is worth $350 billion over 10 years with $110 billion to take effect immediately, was hailed by the White House as a significant expansion of the military relationship between the two countries.