Mon Aug 7, 2017 12:4AM
People vote on the US presidential election at Santa Monica City Hall on November 8, 2016 in Santa Monica, California. (Photo by AFP)
People vote on the US presidential election at Santa Monica City Hall on November 8, 2016 in Santa Monica, California. (Photo by AFP)

Former UK Independence Party (UKIP) leader Nigel Farage has blasted US Republican lawmakers for opposing President Donald Trump, saying Americans voted for change but the GOP is blocking it.

"The political revolution of 2016 with Brexit and with Trump was people voting for change, real, fundamental change. And here we are in the middle of the following year and that change isn't happening," Farage, who Trump has once said would be great as the UK’s ambassador to Washington, said on Fox News on Sunday.

"What's so frustrating on both sides of the pond is that there are people who masquerade as conservatives in order to get themselves elected and are now damaging the attempt for us to get a clean Brexit, stopping the president from getting his agenda through Congress, and I think there is something very fundamental at stake here, it is people's faith and belief in the whole Democratic process," the Brexit campaigner added.

Farage's comments come after the Republican-controlled Senate failed to pass legislation to repeal Obamacare, another humiliating defeat for Trump.

A Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released on Saturday shows nearly two-thirds of Americans want to either keep or modify Obamacare, and a majority of Americans want Congress to turn its attention to other priorities, the survey found.

The law, which helped 20 million people obtain health insurance, has steadily grown more popular.

Member of the European Parliament and former leader of the anti-EU UK Independence Party (UKIP) Nigel Farage gestures as he speaks at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, eastern France, on April 5, 2017. (Photo by AFP)

In June last year, nearly 52 percent of Britons opted to leave the bloc during the EU referendum. Farage was one of the prominent Leave campaigners.

The United Kingdom formally triggered the Brexit process on March 29 and divorce negotiations officially began on June 19. But several British politicians are now reluctant to leave the EU, saying it would damage the country’s economy.