Wed Aug 2, 2017 8:16AM
The Amorphophallus titanum (titan arum) – commonly known as the ‘corpse flower’ – flowering in Scotland for the very first time.
The Amorphophallus titanum (titan arum) – commonly known as the ‘corpse flower’ – flowering in Scotland for the very first time.
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Tens of thousands of visitors have flocked to Scotland to see a rare Sumatran plant at the Royal Botanic Garden in Edinburgh.

The giant plant is known as the "corpse flower" because it pumps out a powerful stink of decaying flesh when it opens.

The smell attracts carnivorous, pollinating insects by making them believe the plant is rotting meat. This is the second time the plant has blossomed in Scotland, after first producing a flower at the Edinburgh gardens two years ago.

Botanists say the enormous central structure can reach over three meters in height, making it possibly the largest bloom in the world.