Sun Jun 4, 2017 6:54AM
A handout picture provided by the Saudi Royal Palace on May 20, 2017, shows US President Donald Trump (2nd-R) and Saudi Arabia's King Salman bin Abdulaziz al-Saud (L) dancing with swords at a welcome ceremony ahead of a banquet at the Murabba Palace in Riyadh. (AFP)
A handout picture provided by the Saudi Royal Palace on May 20, 2017, shows US President Donald Trump (2nd-R) and Saudi Arabia's King Salman bin Abdulaziz al-Saud (L) dancing with swords at a welcome ceremony ahead of a banquet at the Murabba Palace in Riyadh. (AFP)
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Donald Trump, who has been very critical of Islam and Muslims and even attempted to try to prevent Muslims from entering his country, has visited Saudi Arabia to give a speech on Islam.

The Saudis have long been suspected of providing the financing and safe harbor required to pull off the 9/11 terror attacks that hit New York and Washington. The attacks killed nearly 3,000 people. Fifteen of the 19 9/11 hijackers were Saudis, and three had histories of employment with the oil-rich kingdom.            

Equally the Saudis have attracted criticism from much of the Muslim world as Donald Trump before and after his election victory has made offensive comments about Muslims and Islam. For many seeing the overtly Islamophobic president greeted with such warmth by the Saudi regime was an affront to the whole global Islamic community and ultimately showed how disunited and divided the community truly is.