Fri Jun 2, 2017 5:3AM
British Prime Minister Theresa May speaks to journalists at the Balmoral Show near Lisburn, Northern Ireland, on May 13, 2107 during a general election campaign visit.  (Photo by AFP)
British Prime Minister Theresa May speaks to journalists at the Balmoral Show near Lisburn, Northern Ireland, on May 13, 2107 during a general election campaign visit. (Photo by AFP)
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The British general election – due to take place on June 8 - is hotting up. All the major parties have now released their manifestos and the TV debates began last week.

The Conservative Party say the next five years will be the most challenging that Britain has faced since the war, as Brexit will define Britain’s place in the world, its economic security and its future prosperity. They say Britain needs a strong and stable government to get the best Brexit deal for the country and its people. On the other hand, the Labour Party says that faced with falling living standards, growing job insecurity and shrinking public services, people are under increasing strain.

They say what makes this election different is that the choice is starker than ever before – people can choose more of the same: the rich getting richer, more children in poverty, the NHS failing and schools and social care in crisis. Or they can vote for the party that has a plan to change all of this at home as well as enact an ethical foreign policy abroad. Over the weekend Labour and Jeremy Corbyn received something of a polling boost when two surveys put them within nine points of the Conservatives. It is still too early to say whether this marks the start of a significant shift towards Jeremy Corbyn's party but Labour are gaining ground.