Mon May 29, 2017 12:23AM
Counselor to the US president, Kellyanne Conway, (L) checks her phone after taking a photo as US President Donald Trump and leaders of historically black universities and colleges pose for a group photo in the Oval Office of the White House before a meeting with US Vice President Mike Pence February 27, 2017 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by AFP)
Counselor to the US president, Kellyanne Conway, (L) checks her phone after taking a photo as US President Donald Trump and leaders of historically black universities and colleges pose for a group photo in the Oval Office of the White House before a meeting with US Vice President Mike Pence February 27, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by AFP)

White House counselor Kellyanne Conway is pushing back against claims of gender inequality in the White House, asserting that her gender has actually “helped with” handling President Donald Trump.

The former Trump campaign manager made the comments in a Business Insider article published Sunday about women working in the administration.

"I could tell you a great way that my gender has helped me with the president," she said. "I think there's a femininity that is attached to the way one carries herself or the way one executes on her duties.”

Conway, who became famous overnight for coming up with the term “alternative facts” in defense of the White House false propaganda, calls herself “post-feminist, anti-feminist and non-feminist" in the piece.

Kelleyanne Conway arrives in the State Dining Room of the White House for a luncheon on International Women's Day on March 8, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by AFP)

"I don't consider him my peer; he is my boss and he is my elder ... so I don't address him by his first name," she said. "That has actually allowed me, in my view, to respectfully but forcefully express my opinion on certain matters.”

The former Republican pollster maintained that women’s ideas do not go unnoticed under President Trump.

“We're heard and we're seen and we're listened to and we are sought out and sought after for our opinions and our judgment and our ideas and our insight,” she claimed.

The 50-year-old specifically commented about a photo (seen above) of Trump and the white male members of the US House Republican caucus, for which the administration came under fire as it highlighted marginalization of women in the White House.

"It's like, well, I was sitting next to the cameraman, so I was right there, but I'm not in the shot," Conway said. “But that doesn't mean that those men haven't heard from the females.”

White House deputy press secretary Lindsay Walters and deputy national security adviser K.T. McFarland (pictured above), two other women working for the Trump administration, also spoke to the German-owned American news website about the issue.

"When you look at this White House, it's not about male versus female, it's about who is best-suited and most qualified to hold that position," said Walters  (pictured below).

McFarland also asserted that she does not think Trump “cares two hoots whether I was male or female… He just thought I could get the job done."

As a candidate for the 2016 presidential election, Trump came under fire several times for offensive comments towards women.