Wed May 24, 2017 6:13PM
US President Donald Trump and Saudi Arabia's King Salman bin Abdulaziz al-Saud (unseen) stop for coffee, in the terminal of King Khalid International Airport following Trump's arrival in Riyadh on May 20, 2017. (Photo by AFP)
US President Donald Trump and Saudi Arabia's King Salman bin Abdulaziz al-Saud (unseen) stop for coffee, in the terminal of King Khalid International Airport following Trump's arrival in Riyadh on May 20, 2017. (Photo by AFP)
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These are some of the headlines we are tracking for you in this episode of On the News Line:

America’s growing involvement in Syria war

Six years into the deadly conflict in Syria, prospects for a comprehensive peace remain bleak as the West and some of its regional allies continue harboring and supporting terrorist groups in the country.  Israel, which occupied parts of Syria’s Golan Heights in 1981, is widely believed to be among the backers of terrorists in the war-torn country. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has at times voiced support for anti-Syrian government militants who even receive medical treatments in a field hospital in occupied Golan Heights. Nonetheless, many believe that Israel was specifically emboldened to seek adventurism in Syria after the election to office of US President Donald Trump - what eventually led to a wider involvement of America in the conflict, as well.

US-Saudi anti-Iran rhetoric

Well before the US president’s visit to Saudi Arabia, it was evident that Washington and Riyadh would use the trip to step up their rhetoric against Iran, which is, according to Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, fresh from real elections. At a conference attended some heads of states and officials of Muslims countries in Riyadh, Donald Trump overshot the mark and burst into bellicose attacks against Tehran. But Iran did not remain silent. The country’s Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif shot back at Trump and said the latest arms deal between the US and the Arab kingdom is merely aimed at milking Riyadh of hundreds of billions of dollars.