Thu Apr 27, 2017 10:6AM
A woman holds a banner during a march to mark 31 months since the disappearance of 43 students in the state of Guerrero, in Mexico City, Mexico, April 26, 2017. (Photo by Reuters)
A woman holds a banner during a march to mark 31 months since the disappearance of 43 students in the state of Guerrero, in Mexico City, Mexico, April 26, 2017. (Photo by Reuters)
  • Embed

Hundreds of protesters have staged a rally in the Mexican capital, marking 31 months since the disappearance of dozens of students presumed dead after being kidnapped under yet unknown circumstances.

The families and supporters of the 43 Mexican students, who went missing more than two and a half years ago, marched in downtown Mexico City on Wednesday, demanding justice for their loved ones.

Holding pictures of the victims, the protesters criticized the government for its failure to determine what had happened to them.

“Stop already, we will not accept any more lies. Fathers and mothers are asking, ‘When will we have a clear response, the truth, something that is not a lie, something that is not dirty?’” said Hilda Hernandez, the mother of one of the missing students.

Relatives and activists hold pictures during a march to mark 31 months since the disappearance of 43 students in the state of Guerrero, in Mexico City, Mexico, April 26, 2017. (Photo by Reuters)

In September 2014, the 43 young male student-teachers disappeared after police stopped them on their way to attend a demonstration in the southwestern city of Iguala, in Guerrero State. Reports say violent clashes then erupted between police and the students, who were never seen again.

Six months later, Mexico’s government claimed corrupt police officers had handed the students to local drug henchmen, who then incinerated their bodies at a garbage dump. However, investigations by independent forensic experts later discredited the government’s claims.

A group of international experts from the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) have cast doubt on the government’s account of the incident in a number of reports. Earlier this week, the panel said that Mexico’s investigations into the disappearance of the students had stalled.

The case remains open.