Tue Apr 25, 2017 8:23PM
US President Donald Trump signs an executive order to start the Mexico border wall project at the Department of Homeland Security facility in Washington, DC, on January 25, 2017.  (Photos by AFP)
US President Donald Trump signs an executive order to start the Mexico border wall project at the Department of Homeland Security facility in Washington, DC, on January 25, 2017. (Photos by AFP)

A new bill is being introduced in an attempt to fund the border wall US President Donald Trump had promised to build on the Mexican border.

Known as the El Chapo Act, the bill was introduced by Trump’s Republican contender in the 2016 presidential election, Senator Ted Cruz.

The bill, officially titled the Ensuring Lawful Collection of Hidden Assets to Provide Order Act, references Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, Mexico’s most notorious drug lord, who was extradited to the United States in January.

This file handout picture released by the Mexican Interior Ministry on January 19, 2017 shows Joaquin Guzman Loera aka "El Chapo" Guzman (C) escorted in Ciudad Juarez by the Mexican police as he is extradited to the United States.

The US government is seeking a $14 billion forfeiture order over prosecution of Guzman.

The drug lord is an escape artist who managed to break out of prison twice in Mexico.

Republican Texas Senator Ted Cruz arrives at the Capitol in Washington, DC, on  April 7, 2017.

“Fourteen billion dollars will go a long way toward building a wall that will keep Americans safe and hinder the illegal flow of drugs, weapons and individuals across our southern border,” Cruz said on Tuesday.

The US president, who had vowed to build a wall on the country’s southern border and make Mexico pay for it, has been pushing the Republican-controlled Congress to include funding for it in the next spending bill.

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People walk to the beach during the holiday weekend next to the fence along the US-Mexico border in Playas de Tijuana on April 16, 2017, in Tijuana, northwestern Mexico.

US lawmakers have to pass the upcoming spending bill on Friday to avoid a government shutdown.

“If the threat of the wall is removed … our negotiations can continue and we can hopefully resolve all of the outstanding issues by Friday,” said Senate Democratic leader, Chuck Schumer, on Tuesday.

Meanwhile, Mexcio called the plan to build a wall on its northern an "unfriendly, hostile" act and a "bad idea."

"If the negotiation on other themes — immigration, the border, trade — isn't satisfactory to Mexico's interests, we will have to review our existing cooperation," said Mexican Foreign Secretary Luis Videgaray on Tuesday. "This would be especially in the security areas ... and that involves the national immigration agency, the federal police and of course, the armed forces."

Mexican Foreign Secretary Luis Videgaray speaks during a press conference at the Mexican Embassy in Washington, DC, April 6, 2017.

He further suggested that Mexico was considering imposing fees on Americas intending to enter the country.

"We could explore — not necessarily a visa, that could impede a lot of people from coming to Mexico — but we could perhaps (have) a fee associated with entry. This is something that I'm sure will be part of our discussion, and I believe we can find points of agreement," Videgaray said.