Wed Apr 19, 2017 5:21PM
Members of an Egyptian archaeological team work on a wooden coffin discovered in a 3,500-year-old tomb in the Draa Abul Nagaa necropolis, near the southern Egyptian city of Luxor, on April 18, 2017. (AFP)
Members of an Egyptian archaeological team work on a wooden coffin discovered in a 3,500-year-old tomb in the Draa Abul Nagaa necropolis, near the southern Egyptian city of Luxor, on April 18, 2017. (AFP)

Egyptian archaeologists have unveiled a fleet of relics, which can tell you endless tales of the world’s earliest civilizations.

More than 1,000 statues as well as 10 adorned stone coffins and mummies were uncovered in an ancient nobleman’s tomb located on the Nile River’s west bank in Luxor.

The newly-found tomb reportedly belonged to a judge named Userhat who lived in ancient Egypt roughly 3,000 years ago. A collection of figurines, wooden masks and other remains were also found in one of the crypt’s rooms.

A massive granite statue of Ramses II was also unveiled at Luxor Temple after unearthing the tomb. The granite colossus stands at 11 meters tall and weighs about 75 tons. Egypt’s tourism officials say the discoveries will boost the number of visits to the country.

Archeologists are studying the invaluable discoveries hoping that they would reveal some of the mysteries of the early Egyptian civilization. Further excavation is still underway and more remains are expected to be found as the project continues.