Thu Apr 6, 2017 2:46PM
File photo shows Hojjatoleslam Seyyed Ebrahim Raeisi, the current custodian of the Holy Shrine of Imam Reza (PBUH) in the northeastern Iranian city of Mashhad.
File photo shows Hojjatoleslam Seyyed Ebrahim Raeisi, the current custodian of the Holy Shrine of Imam Reza (PBUH) in the northeastern Iranian city of Mashhad.

Hojjatoleslam Seyyed Ebrahim Raeisi, who is the current custodian of the Holy Shrine of Imam Reza (PBUH) in the northeastern Iranian city of Mashhad, has declared his readiness to run for president in the forthcoming presidential election, his representative has said.

“Raeisi has accepted the request to run as candidate [for president] and his plans will be announced soon,” said Hojjatoleslam Raeisi's representative, Seyyed Sowlat Mortazavi, who is also the mayor of Mashhad, adding that Raeisi had officially announced his candidacy after receiving several requests to this effect.

Mortazavi made the remarks on Thursday during the second meeting of the national assembly of the Popular Front of the Islamic Revolution Forces, held at Shahr-e Aftab Complex, south of the capital, Tehran.   

This photo shows a general view of the second meeting of the Popular Front of the Islamic Revolution Forces’ national assembly in south Tehran. (Photo by Fars)

During the meeting, the participants shortlisted their five final candidates for the forthcoming presidential poll through voting. The shortlist included Hojjatoleslam Raeisi, who garnered 2,147 votes, followed by Alireza Zakani, a former lawmaker, with 1,546 votes, Mehrdad Bazrpash, also a former lawmaker, with 1,404 votes, Mohammad Baqer Qalibaf, who is the current mayor of Tehran, with 1,373 votes, and Parviz Fattah, the current head of the Imam Khomeini Relief Foundation, with 994 votes. 

The five were elected from a total of ten candidates, who had been chosen in the first meeting of the assembly, which was held at the same venue on February 23.

Iranians will go to the polls on May 19 to take part in the country’s 12th presidential election.

Two major political camps are at the heart of Iran’s politics, which are known as Reformists and Principlists. All other possible candidates not affiliated with any one of these two camps are considered as independent.

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