Thu Apr 6, 2017 5:58AM
A handout picture provided by the Saudi Royal Palace on April 5, 2017 shows Saudi Arabia's King Salman bin Abdulaziz al-Saud (R) receiving British Prime Minister Theresa May in the capital Riyadh. (Photo by AFP)
A handout picture provided by the Saudi Royal Palace on April 5, 2017 shows Saudi Arabia's King Salman bin Abdulaziz al-Saud (R) receiving British Prime Minister Theresa May in the capital Riyadh. (Photo by AFP)
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British Prime Minster Theresa May is “positioning herself in defense of grand war criminals” in order to boost her country’s economy, according to a political commentator in London, but “you can’t base growth or even the future of the country on war crimes.”

“The only reason why she is arguing that because Britain is leaving the European Union, and then Britain needs to find basically new markets to be able to boost its economy,” said Catherine Shakdam, the programs director of Shafaqna Institute for Mideast Studies.

Shafaqna made the remarks in an interview with Press TV on Wednesday while talking about May’s hopes to tap Saudi Arabia’s “immense potential” to boost UK economy.   

The analyst stated that May is OK with basically boosting Britain’s economy on the blood of the innocent," referring to the people dying in result of the Saudi war on Yemen and other Riyadh-sponsored conflicts in the Middle East region. 

“Her policy is to turn a blind eye to genocide in Yemen and the promotion of Wahhabism/terrorism across the world for the sake of her country’s economic future,” she said..

“I am hoping that it’s a non-argument because you can’t base growth or even the future of the country on war crimes," the commentator continued. 

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All this has put the British premier in a position where “she is promoting fascism,” she pointed out.

A handout picture provided by the Saudi Royal Palace on April 4, 2017 shows Crown Prince Muhammad bin Nayef bin Abdulaziz Al Saud (L-2) shaking hands with a British military officer during his meeting with British Prime Minister Theresa May (L-1) in the capital Riyadh. (Photo by AFP)

While meeting in Riyadh with Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Nayef, May defended the British relationship with Saudi Arabia amid growing calls to pressure the Middle Eastern kingdom over its military campaign in Yemen and human rights record.

Shafaqna said, “They [Saudis] are buying out Western nations’ silence, and they are buying out world institutions.”

“They are promoting and kind of lobbying different Western capitals to continue their sickening agenda in the Middle East and across the Islamic world,” she noted.

Both the UK and Saudi Arabia have supported extremist militant groups that have been waging wars against the governments of Iraq and Syria over the past few years.

The UK exported more than £6.5 billion in goods and services to Saudi Arabia in 2015, making it Britain’s largest trading partner in the Middle East.

British Prime Minister Theresa May (R) meets with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Nayef in Riyadh, April 4, 2017. (Photo by AFP)

Britain has also been one of the biggest suppliers of weapons to Riyadh for 40 years, an issue that has come under close scrutiny because of the war in Yemen, which has killed more than 12,000 people, at least half of them civilians.

Saudi Arabia launched the offensive against Yemen in March 2015 in an attempt to bring back the former government to power and undermine the Houthi Ansarullah movement.