Tue Apr 4, 2017 09:01PM
Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev visits Alexandra Land on the remote Arctic islands of Franz Josef Land, Russia on March 29, 2017. (Photo by AFP)
Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev visits Alexandra Land on the remote Arctic islands of Franz Josef Land, Russia on March 29, 2017. (Photo by AFP)

Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev has said that corruption allegations leveled against him were “nonsense and dishonest."

In a recently released video, anti-corruption activist Alexei Navalny claimed that Medvedev was the owner of an archipelago of luxury homes and several yachts. 

"It is done by a mishmash principle. They take different bits of rubbish, collect various nonsense. When it comes to me -- it is about some of my acquaintances and people of whom I have never heard of, about some places where I have been and also places where I have never heard of,” said Medvedev during a visit to Russia's Tambov region.

The remarks were the first by Medvedev in relation to the accusations made on Navalny's video on March 2. It also claimed that the Russian premier benefited a business network based on bribes and offshore accounts.

“They collect some papers, photographs and clothes, and then they create a product and show it off. It is obviously hard for a person who watches it to figure it out. And in case it was well paid for the product is rather high-quality," added Medvedev.

Navalny’s claims resulted in mass demonstrations across the country on March 26 when hundreds of protesters, including Navalny, were detained.

Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny, who was arrested during March 26 anti-corruption rally, gestures during an appeal hearing at a court in Moscow on March 30, 2017.

Navalny was sentenced to 15 days in prison for provoking unauthorized protests and disobeying police officers.  

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Riot police officers detain a protester during an unauthorized anti-corruption rally in central Moscow on March 26, 2017. 

“With no shame. And to this end he drags people onto the streets, who are often underage -- which is nearly a crime in my view -- and he in fact makes them the hostages of his own political agenda. And it is known that this character has a criminal record and there should be no illusions over that," added Medvedev. "If I reacted each time to such attacks I simply wouldn't manage to get on with my job as normal."