Sun Apr 2, 2017 2:35AM
Anti-fascist activists clash with police as they counter protest against marches by the far-right English Defense League and Britain First in central London on April 1, 2017.  (Photo by AFP)
Anti-fascist activists clash with police as they counter protest against marches by the far-right English Defense League and Britain First in central London on April 1, 2017. (Photo by AFP)

Fewer than 300 people have taken part in a rally in favor of Islamophobia in the British capital.

Organized by anti-Islam groups Britain First and the English Defense League, the separate rallies, dubbed as a “march against terrorism,” were castigated by the supporters as lame attempts to boost Islamophobia.

Out of 1.6 million Facebook followers of Britain First, more than 2,700 had voiced interest in partaking in the demo.

 Around the same number of people also took part in a counter-rally, organized by Unite Against Fascism (UAF).

The Metropolitan police arrested 14 people after clashes broke out between the rival mobs.

Speaking to the crowd in London, the leader of Britain First, Paul Golding, complained of how difficult it had become to eat tikka masala because of the popularity of halal meat.

“We are the face of the future,” he added.

A Britain First organizer told The Guardian that “Muslims don’t want to integrate,” further accusing them of “raping our kids.”

The demonstrations finished on the Victoria Embankment, near Westminster Bridge, where a deadly terrorist attack occurred recently.

The attack left 10 people dead and 50 others injured.

“While we recognize that this despicable attempt to use the outrage of the Westminster attack to whip up hate fell flat, this should not be cause for complacency. These groups remain intent on stirring racial and religious hatred and must be opposed wherever they rear their head,” said Weyman Bennett, the UAF joint secretary. “It is critical we unite against fascism, racism, Islamophobia and anti-semitism at this time.”