Mon Mar 27, 2017 09:29PM
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May (R) and Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon pose for a photograph ahead of their meeting in a hotel in Glasgow, on March 27, 2017.
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May (R) and Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon pose for a photograph ahead of their meeting in a hotel in Glasgow, on March 27, 2017.

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon holds a meeting with British Prime Minister Theresa May ahead of Britain’s exit from the European Union.

There were no immediate comments from May on Monday but the Scottish leader described the meeting in Glasgow as "cordial and businesslike."

Sturgeon has been making efforts to bring about a second referendum for Scotland after the first one failed to lead to the country’s independence.

She told the state-funded BBC that she was expecting the British premier to “offer” something.

"I had been under the impression ... that she was coming to offer something in the way of more powers (for Scotland)," she said. "It turned out that wasn't the case."

The talks were held as Scotland'd assembly was preparing to resume a debate on independence 

May has promised to begin the Brexit process in March and complete it by 2019. The EU has warned that Britain would have less than 18 months to reach a deal to exit the bloc once Brexit negotiations begin.

Sturgeon has said a referendum should be held in late 2018 or early 2019, when the terms of Brexit become clear.

London says Edinburgh’s move to seek independence at such a time would cause huge economic uncertainty.

Scotland held its first referendum in 2014, when over 55 percent of the people voted against independence on Tuesday.

At a referendum later, nearly 52 percent of Britons opted to leave the EU although some 62 percent of the Scottish people had voted against the decision.

Meanwhile, the British leader is calling for unity all over the UK in the wake of Brexit.

"As Britain leaves the European Union, and we forge a new role for ourselves in the world, the strength and stability of our union will become even more important," she told staff from the Department for International Development in East Kilbride in southern Scotland. "When we work together and set our sights on a task, we really are an unstoppable force."