Mon Mar 20, 2017 8:56PM
US President Donald Trump greets Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi as he arrives to the White House on March 20, 2017, in Washington, DC. (Photo by AFP)
US President Donald Trump greets Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi as he arrives to the White House on March 20, 2017, in Washington, DC. (Photo by AFP)
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US President Donald Trump has questioned the Iran nuclear deal amid a visit by Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi.

Trump, who has been a staunch opponent of the international agreement negotiated by the US under President Barack Obama, took the opportunity to criticize it amid meeting Abadi in the White House on Monday.

The billionaire-turned-president told an Iraqi delegation that he was wondering why Obama supported the deal, dubbed the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), further asserting "nobody" knows why.

US President Donald Trump listens while Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi speaks during their meeting in the Cabinet Room in the White House on March 20, 2017, in Washington, DC. (Photo by AFP)

“One of the things I did ask is, 'Why did President Obama sign that agreement with Iran?' because nobody has been able to figure that one out," Trump said. "But maybe someday we'll be able to figure that one out."

Since he started campaigning for the 2016 presidential election, Trump has criticized the Obama administration for backing the JCPOA, also supported by the UK, Germany, Russia, China, and France.

The new president has said that Iran is one of the topics for discussion between Washington and Baghdad during the visit by Abadi and his delegation.

Discussing Daesh

The Republican president welcomed the Iraqi premier to the White House for his first meeting since Trump gained power.

Trump said it was a "great honor" to meet the Iraqi prime minister, the 9th foreign leader received by the US president.

The two also discussed the Daesh Takfiri terrorists’ militancy in Iraq.

Before leaving the Iraqi capital Baghdad for the afternoon meeting, Abadi said in a video statement, "We are in the last chapter, the final stages to eliminate ISIL militarily in Iraq."

US President Donald Trump (R) meets with Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi in the Oval Office in the White House on March 20, 2017, in Washington, DC. (Photo by AFP)

In Washington, he also stated that Iraq has "the strongest counter-terrorism forces, but we are looking forward to more cooperation between us and the US."

Tackling what Trump refers to "radical Islamic terrorism," was one of his campaign promises as the GOP nominee for 2016 presidential election.

Meanwhile in Iraq, a fight to completely liberate areas under the Takfiris’ control continued.

Daesh terrorists were among militants initially trained by the CIA in Jordan in 2012 to destabilize the Syrian government.