Sat Mar 11, 2017 07:01PM
Yemenis check the site of an air raid by the Saudi warplanes that hit a funeral reception in the Arhab district, 40 kilometres (25 miles) north of the capital Sana'a, on February 16, 2017. (Photo by AFP)
Yemenis check the site of an air raid by the Saudi warplanes that hit a funeral reception in the Arhab district, 40 kilometres (25 miles) north of the capital Sana'a, on February 16, 2017. (Photo by AFP)
  • Embed

Every bomb Saudi warplanes drop on Yemeni people will consolidate their support for the Ansarullah movement rather than weaken their faith in resistance, a London-based political analyst says.

Shabir Hassanally, an activist and Islamic scholar, made the remarks after a Saudi airstrike on a marketplace in Yemen in which dozens of people were killed. 

“So far in just over two years you have got Saudi Arabia pummeling Yemen, literally bombing it day in, day out. To what end? What war objective Saudis are going to achieve? If it hasn’t achieved them today, it won’t achieve in a hundred years,” he noted.

The analyst further continued that if Saudi officials are under some sort of illusion that the more they pound Yemen, the more Yemenis are going to turn around, they must know that this is a wishful thinking.

“Every time they throw a bomb, be it a big one, be it a small one, on Yemen, they increase the support for the resistance. This is a formula that was experienced by the Israelis when they did something very similar to Lebanon, to Gaza. Every day when they bombed these countries, they found the resistance progressively stronger,” Hassanally underscored.

He also warned against the sale of weapons to Saudi Arabia, saying this is a short-term policy.

“While America, Britain, Brazil and all of these countries are milking the Saudi cow for money, they should realize that this is very short-sighted position to take. If they really want stability in the Middle East, if they want to continue having trade with countries in the Middle East, they need to cut ties with the two cancers in the Middle East; the Arab Zionists of Saudi Arabia, the Persian Gulf countries like the Emirates and Qatar .... and with the core Zionist entity so-called Israel. These two entities are the two biggest creators of instability globally,” Hassanally concluded. 

Saudi Arabia began its deadly campaign against Yemen in late March 2015 in a bid to restore power to Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi, Yemen's president who has resigned and is backed by Riyadh. The campaign also sought to undermine the Houthi Ansarullah movement.

The Saudi aggression has claimed the lives of over 12,000 people, according to figures compiled by the Yemeni non-governmental monitoring group Legal Center for Rights and Development.