Fri Mar 3, 2017 3:5PM
The dome of St Paul's Cathedral stands above "The Marie Curie Garden of Light", consisting of 2,100 handmade daffodils, each representing one of the terminal illness charity's nurses, in Paternoster Square in the City of London, March 2, 2017. (AP Photo)
The dome of St Paul's Cathedral stands above "The Marie Curie Garden of Light", consisting of 2,100 handmade daffodils, each representing one of the terminal illness charity's nurses, in Paternoster Square in the City of London, March 2, 2017. (AP Photo)
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A garden of bright flowers has been grown literally overnight in a London cathedral for charity purposes.

2,100 handmade daffodils were placed at Saint Paul’s Cathedral to mark the opening of a charity for those living with terminal illnesses.

The illuminated installation is dubbed 'Garden of Light' and was designed in support of the Great Daffodil Appeal, which is a fundraising campaign arranged by Marie Curie Organization.

Each of the lit-up flowers is meant to represent one of the nurses working across Britain, implying that they light up their patients’ dark days.


The floral arrangement comes with winding pathways for visitors to walk along.

The passages are equipped with recorded narrations of thank you letters written by the patients’ families.