Sat Jan 28, 2017 7:45AM
Bolivia's President Evo Morales speaks at a ceremony to mark 11 years of his administration during a session of the congress in La Paz, Bolivia, January 22, 2017. (Photo by Reuters)
Bolivia's President Evo Morales speaks at a ceremony to mark 11 years of his administration during a session of the congress in La Paz, Bolivia, January 22, 2017. (Photo by Reuters)

As Mexico-US ties sour over the new US administration’s controversial anti-immigration policies, Bolivia urges Mexico to turn to the South American countries rather than Washington, citing capitalism’s demise.

“The neoliberal model has failed and capitalism has failed too," Bolivian President Evo Morales said on Friday.

Morales further noted that he had taken to Twitter and called on Mexico to unite with the Latin American and Caribbean states.

"I asked our Mexican brothers to look further south and we can all go after our hopes together, with our Latin American and Caribbean identity, we are a great family,” he said.

The Bolivian president further referred to Trump’s recent cancellation of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), of which Mexico is a member.

“Imagine those who were in the Pacific alliance who now feel abandoned by the new president of the United States,” he said.

On Monday, Trump scrapped the TPP, a flagship trade agreement among 11 countries in the Pacific rim.

Two days later, the US president signed executive orders directing the construction of a wall along the border with Mexico, boosting border patrol forces and immigration enforcement officers who carry out deportations. 

Workers continue work raising a taller fence in the Mexico-US border separating Mexico’s Anapra from Sunland Park in the state of New Mexico, January 25, 2017. (Photo by AP)

He also confirmed his plans to build the US-Mexico border wall with federal funds and then seek reimbursement from Mexico City.

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto condemned Trump's decision to erect the wall, saying his country would not pay for the project.

Annual bilateral trade between the two neighbor countries is valued at almost $600 billion.