Sun Jan 22, 2017 03:21PM
Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak gestures while addressing the Extraordinary Session of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) on the Rohingya situation in Myanmar, in Kuala Lumpur on January 19, 2017. © AFP
Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak gestures while addressing the Extraordinary Session of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) on the Rohingya situation in Myanmar, in Kuala Lumpur on January 19, 2017. © AFP
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These are some of the headlines we are tracking for you in this episode of On the News Line:

Rohingya crisis continues

Malaysia has hosted a special meeting of foreign ministers from the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, to discuss the plight of Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar’s Rakhine state. Malaysia’s Prime Minister Najib Razak in his opening speech to the meeting stated that Muslim nations should unite to help end the persecution of the Rohingya. Najib said the crisis in Rakhine was no longer Myanmar's internal affair, stressing that it had already affected the neighboring states. He also warned that the ongoing violence against the Rohingya could enable militant groups including Daesh to infiltrate that community.

Trumps' anger at his inauguration

America has a new president. Donald Trump took the oath of office on Friday to become the 45th president of the United States. Presidential inaugurations are usually a time for national celebrations but the run-up to Friday’s event and the swearing in ceremony were marred by widespread protests in Washington and other cities. Human rights defenders and African-American activists were among those who helped organize rallies and protests against the new occupant of the Oval Office. Trump has caused numerous controversies at home and abroad. His rhetoric against minorities including migrants, African-Americans and Muslims and his stances against Democratic politicians and even fellow Republicans have left America more divided than ever.

‘Saudi, Qatar sponsoring terror’

Many people and observers and even governments have on frequent occasions accused Saudi Arabia and Qatar of promoting extremism and terror in the Middle East and beyond. This time, a former UN chief has leveled similar accusations against Qatar. Kofi Annan has told a news website that Doha is a major state sponsor of terrorism.  Annan said UN researches show that 15 commanders of terror groups have permanently shuttled to and from Doha between 2003 to 2016. He also said one of the main missions of Qatar’s English and Arabic speaking television station Al-Jazeera is to create crisis in the Middle East and sow dissent between Sunni and Shia Muslims as well as between Muslims and Christians. This, Annan said, is done in cooperation with Qatar’s spying apparatus and Israel’s Mossad.