Wed Nov 23, 2016 12:39AM
Jet in Carina: Composed of gas and dust, the pillar resides in a tempestuous stellar nursery called the Carina Nebula, located 7,500 light-years away in the southern constellation Carina. (Photo and caption via hubblesite.org)
Jet in Carina: Composed of gas and dust, the pillar resides in a tempestuous stellar nursery called the Carina Nebula, located 7,500 light-years away in the southern constellation Carina. (Photo and caption via hubblesite.org)

The administration of US President-elect Donald Trump is planning to reduce NASA’s activities on climate change and use the budget for space exploration instead, an adviser says.

"We would start by having a stretch goal of exploring the entire solar system by the end of the century,” former congressman Bob Walker told The Telegraph.

Walker, who used to chair President George W. Bush's Commission on the Future of the US Aerospace Industry before advising Trump on space policy, described NASA as "a logistics agency concentrating on space station resupply and politically correct environmental monitoring."

The main body of the scientific community believes that space exploration is crucial for a better understanding of our universe.

Mankind’s exploration of the space does not surpass the moon, despite efforts underway for years to visit Mars.

"You stretch your technology experts and create technologies that wouldn't otherwise be needed. I think aspirational goals are a good thing. Fifty years ago it was the ability to go to the moon," Walker added.

Astronaut Eugene Cernan walks toward the Lunar Roving Vehicle at the Taurus-Littrow landing site of Apollo 17 on December 19, 1972. (Photo via Wikipedia)

 In 1972, Captain Gene Cernan left the moon to be the last one of only twelve people who have ever set foot on the lunar surface.

“It is very plausible to speculate that the new administration will insert a mission to the lunar surface, probably international in character, as a step on the way to Mars," John Logsdon, a space policy analyst, told the Mirror.

In the run-up to his November 8 victory, the GOP nominee echoed the party’s stance on climate change, calling the scientifically proven phenomenon a “Chinese hoax.”

NASA's Earth Science Division received $1.92 billion in funding in 2016, nearly 30 percent more than the previous year.

American celebrity astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson has been one of the main proponents of space exploration, making the case in favor of it on several occasions.