Tue Nov 15, 2016 09:11PM
US House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) speaks to the press November 9, 2016 in Janesville, Wisconsin. (Photo by AFP)
US House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) speaks to the press November 9, 2016 in Janesville, Wisconsin. (Photo by AFP)

Paul Ryan has managed to stay at helm in the US House of Representatives thanks to his last-ditch return to the campaign of President-elect Donald Trump.

The Wisconsin Republican, who got engaged in a bitter row with Trump ahead of the 2016 presidential election, remained the House speaker after receiving unanimous support at a closed-door GOP conference on Tuesday

As Trump won the US Presidency on November 8, his party’s lawmakers also managed to retain control over the US Congress by gaining majority both in the House and the Senate.

Ryan, who has been dealing with the Democratic administration of President Barack Obama so far, heralded "the dawn of a new, unified Republican government.”

"It feels really good to say that actually," he said. "This will be a government focused on turning President-elect Trump's victory into real progress for the American people."

He will have to win a floor vote as well when the lawmakers get together again in January 2017.

Ryan tried to avoid speaking against Trump’s policies, saying "These are things we're working on. ... The point is Donald Trump wants job," in response to a question on whether the Congress would go along with Trump's plan to spend $1 trillion on infrastructure.

File photo of Donald Trump (L) and Paul Ryan 

Ryan has previously criticized Trump’s calls for a complete ban on Muslims entering the United States and has described his anti-Hispanic comments as the “textbook definition” of racism.

He even said he would not campaign alongside Trump anymore after the realty TV star’s claims of sexual assault in a 2005 recording were leaked.

Later, the highest elected GOP official changed his mind by offering to campaign alongside Trump and also wrote an op-ed for CNN, urging Americans to back the billionaire.

“What helps Republicans more: infighting or unifying, focusing on Clinton or focusing on our differences as Republicans?” stated the speaker. “I don’t want to harm our team going into the election. I want to unify our team going into the election so as many of our candidates as possible can win this election,” he said during an interview on WTMJ in Milwaukee, one day ahead of the Election Day.