Thu Nov 10, 2016 07:07PM
US President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office at the White House, Washington, DC, November 10, 2016. (Photo by AFP)
US President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office at the White House, Washington, DC, November 10, 2016. (Photo by AFP)
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US President Barack Obama and President-elect Donald Trump have held their first ever meeting at the White House, touching on various issues including the transition of power.

One day after being elected as America’s 45th president, Trump joined Obama in the Oval Office on Thursday.

Speaking to the press after the roughly 90-minute meeting, Obama hailed the “excellent conversation” with his successor and said he was ready to do all he could to ensure Trump’s success “because if you succeed, then the country succeeds.”

Trump said he “discussed a lot of different situations -- some wonderful and some difficulties," with Obama, adding that he looked forward to receiving the outgoing president’s counsel.

As America’s first ever black president, Obama on January 20 would officially hand over the power to Trump, the first ever US president without any previous position in the government or the military.

US President Barack Obama speaks while meeting with President-elect Donald Trump (L) following a meeting in the Oval Office, Washington, DC, November 10, 2016. (Photo by AFP)

Melania Trump, the president-elect’s wife, also met with First Lady Michelle Obama, fresh off a campaign that saw the latter accusing the former of plagiarizing her speeches.

The White House encounter between the outgoing and the incoming US presidential families came merely days after Trump and Obama traded their last barbs during one of the darkest presidential campaigns in America’s history.

During a campaign for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton on November 6, only two days before Election Day, Obama made fun of Trump’s Twitter habits and said his inability to control his social networking accounts meant that he could not be trusted with the nation’s nuclear codes.

Trump responded by advising the outgoing president to “do his job” and stop campaigning for Clinton.

Following Trump’s historic victory against Clinton, however, Obama congratulated him and called on Democrats to help him with the transition.