Wed Nov 9, 2016 02:51PM
Students unhappy with the election of Donald Trump as president protest at the campus of UCLA in Los Angeles, California, on Wednesday, November 9, 2016. (Photo by Los Angeles Times)
Students unhappy with the election of Donald Trump as president protest at the campus of UCLA in Los Angeles, California, on Wednesday, November 9, 2016. (Photo by Los Angeles Times)

Protests have erupted in cities across the US after Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump was declared the winner of the nation’s presidential election.

Although there were protests in various cities in the country, the West Coast appeared to have the most activity.

More than 100 protesters unhappy with Trump’s election staged a march on Wednesday morning in Portland, Oregon.

The protesters chanted anti-Trump slogans and blocked traffic in the area. Some of the protesters burned the US flag, littering the streets with debris.

Trump's election victory also sparked protests early Wednesday across the state of California, drawing crowds to city streets and college campuses.

The demonstrators openly disavowed the president-elect and a few resorted to vandalism, reflecting their sadness, anger and bursts of rage.

A violent protest also erupted in San Francisco and nearby Oakland. Demonstrators set fire to an effigy of Trump and smashed front windows of buildings across the bay from San Francisco.

Up to 1,500 people gathered at the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA) shortly after Trump delivered a victory speech in New York City.

Students also held protests on the campuses of the University of California in Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz, Irvine and San Diego.

Protesters rally against Donald Trump outside the White House in Washington during the US presidential election night on November 9, 2016. (Photo by AFP)

In the nation’s capital on the East Coast, a crowd of more than 1,000 people showed up in front of the White House early Wednesday morning to oppose a future Trump administration.

The protesters in Washington said they feel betrayed and scared at the prospect of Trump’s presidency.

Trump stunned the world by defeating heavily favored Clinton in Tuesday's presidential election, sending the United States on a new, uncertain path.

Trump rode a wave of anger toward the elite US establishment to win the White House race against Clinton, a longtime Washington insider.

Pollsters may not have understood the depth of the resentment towards the former first lady, US senator and secretary of state, whom many saw as a corrupt member of the elite Washington establishment.

Trump, who at 70 will be the oldest first-term US president, defeated his Democratic rival after a bitter and divisive campaign. During the campaign, Trump was the target of sharp disapproval, not just from Democrats but from many in his own party.