Sun Aug 7, 2016 9:19AM
Lt. Gen. Hamad Mohamed Thani Al Rumaithy, UAE armed forces chief of staff(R) takes part in a troop inspection with Col. Jason T. Garkey, a senior US commander, during an arrival ceremony at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, August 5, 2016, in Arlington, Virginia. ©AFP
Lt. Gen. Hamad Mohamed Thani Al Rumaithy, UAE armed forces chief of staff(R) takes part in a troop inspection with Col. Jason T. Garkey, a senior US commander, during an arrival ceremony at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, August 5, 2016, in Arlington, Virginia. ©AFP
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These are some of the headlines we are tracking for you in this episode of On the News Line:

US militaristic approach

The US has been expanding its military operations in different countries despite claims that Washington has restricted its involvement in conflicts overseas. The American military has been carrying out attacks including both airstrikes and ground assaults in a number of countries in the Middle East and its periphery. The US warplanes and troops have for a long time been engaged in attacks and secret operations in such countries as Yemen, Iraq, Syria, and Afghanistan. The US participated in the NATO aerial campaign in Libya in 2011 amid a popular uprising against the country’s former ruler Muammar Gaddafi. Following Gaddafi’s overthrow, the US rolled back its military involvement in Libya. But it is back on the stage to influence the situation in the north African nation. At no time in history has the US been involved in as many wars as it is now engaged.

Foreign hands against Turkey

A surprising revelation emerged in the media this past week that may show some foreign hands were involved in the failed coup in Turkey. Reports say Qatar's Defense Minister Khalid al-Attiyah in a recent tweet said he had obtained a confidential document that could prove that Riyadh and Abu Dhabi supported the coup. The document proved an army officer in the UAE and a Saudi Arabian prince was aware of plans for the coup, but failed to notify the Turkish president. Qatar has been quick to deny this. But it is nonetheless expected to upset relations between Ankara and its Persian Gulf allies.  

Trump: Anti-establishment

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is all over the headlines: His recent spat with the family of a slain Muslim soldier, his refusal to back House Speaker Paul Ryan's re-election bid and the controversy surrounding his support for Russia. But Trump still manages to draw hundreds of his supporters to campaign events. But beneath his controversial tone, his racial slurs and his undiplomatic language lies a hatred toward the establishment.