Wed Jun 29, 2016 6:22AM
This file photo taken on October 1976 shows demonstrators running away from a police charge during racial riots, in Cape town. After violent clashes in Soweto on June 1976, new incidents bursted out in October 1976 between black demonstrators and police in Cape Town. (AFP)
This file photo taken on October 1976 shows demonstrators running away from a police charge during racial riots, in Cape town. After violent clashes in Soweto on June 1976, new incidents bursted out in October 1976 between black demonstrators and police in Cape Town. (AFP)

Africa Today marks the 40-year anniversary of the June 1976 Soweto uprising, where hundreds of young people protested against the apartheid government and their impositions.

One such imposition was that Afrikaans as a medium of instruction. Today, South Africa's youth still face challenges accessing and being able to afford quality education. This week, Africa Today asks, 40 years after the Soweto uprisings, what’s changed for South African students?

Forty years since the June 16th 1976 Soweto uprisings, South Africa continues to face student unrest. This year, it’s about the unfulfilled promise of free education and better access to higher education for Black Africans. With municipal elections set for early August, President Zuma is also dealing with protests about the integrity and efficiency of his government. This week, Africa Today asks if South African youth can be the catalyst for change yet again.