Sat Jun 25, 2016 9:15AM
According to a World Health Organization study, published in the journal of BMC Medicine, cases of major depression are on the rise throughout the world. Some argue that Ramadan is an anti-dote to depression. (File photo)
According to a World Health Organization study, published in the journal of BMC Medicine, cases of major depression are on the rise throughout the world. Some argue that Ramadan is an anti-dote to depression. (File photo)
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According to a World Health Organization study, published in the journal of BMC Medicine, cases of major depression are on the rise throughout the world. The study concludes that depression is a severe global problem and will be the second leading cause of disability by 2020.

The holy month of Ramadan provides a communal atmosphere where Muslims meet to pray together and often break their fasts together every single day. The social aspect of this is deeply significant — bonds are created, hearts are softened and an important sense of belonging is established.

Some argue that one of the benefits of the month of Ramadan is that it is an anti-dote to depression. To what extent does that work?  Do people really make the time for each other that will help those that crave communal interaction in order to counter the isolation that often seems to be a feature the modern lifestyle?

The culture of Ramadan is such that it automatically encourages the community to come together, which counters the isolation of modern-day living. The concept of people connecting with people in order to connect with Allah provides communal togetherness that needs to be nurtured. One could argue that the path to Allah lies through the uniting and helping of the community.