Wed May 25, 2016 8:26AM
A displaced child poses in front of a burnt house following attacks by Fulani herdsmen at Okokolo-Agatu in Benue State, north-central Nigeria, May 10, 2016. (Photo by AFP)
A displaced child poses in front of a burnt house following attacks by Fulani herdsmen at Okokolo-Agatu in Benue State, north-central Nigeria, May 10, 2016. (Photo by AFP)
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The British prime minister was embarrassingly caught on camera labeling Nigeria ‘fantastically corrupt,’ and the media reacted in the typically outraged fashion, but there’s been less shock elsewhere.

Nigeria’s more surprising failures included the ill-treatment that has been meted out to some of its minorities, including Shia Muslims and others suspected sometimes incorrectly of challenging the state.

The massacre of around a thousand Shia Muslims was under President Muhammadu Buhari’s watch, and possibly on his order.

This contrasts his pledge for widespread reforms in an attempt to improve Nigeria’s rights record and the level of transparency within the country.

Amnesty International recently reported that some 150 detainees, including babies, have died “in horrendous conditions” at a military detention center for suspected Boko Haram militants in northeast Nigeria this year.

Amnesty has also documented extra-judicial executions, enforced disappearances, and the use of torture, looting and other violations by the state security forces of Nigeria.