Wed Apr 27, 2016 09:49AM
President of Iran Hassan Rouhani attends the 13th Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) Summit at Istanbul Congress Center (ICC) on April 14, 2016 in Istanbul. (AFP)
President of Iran Hassan Rouhani attends the 13th Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) Summit at Istanbul Congress Center (ICC) on April 14, 2016 in Istanbul. (AFP)
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Saudi Arabia used its financial leverage over a number of OIC member states to make sure the summit condemn Iran and Hezbollah in four paragraphs.

The Organization of Islamic Cooperation was founded in 1969 and claims to be the collective voice of the Muslim world. The Arab defeat against Israel in what’s known as the six-day war in 1967 and the arson attack on the Al-Aqsa mosque by the Israelis in 1969 prompted the leaders of Islamic countries to come together, the first such assembly, in Rabat, Morocco. That meeting led to the establishment of the OIC. Preventing Israeli expansionism is the OIC’s raison d’eter. Half a century since its founding, the organization seems to have lost its way and is accusing a group that’s scored the most victories against Israel, especially in the 33-day Lebanon war, based on the pretext of interference. 

Iran’s political and military officials have said repeatedly that Iranian forces are in Syria at the request of the Syrian government. Still, the final statement of the conference, drawn up in Iran’s absence, accuses Tehran of interference in Syria. But what the OIC completely ignored was Turkey’s illegal military presence in northern Iraq or Saudi’s invasion of Yemen and the slaughtering of its people. 

Meanwhile, it looks like that a tension is rising between America and Saudi Arabia since the commencement of the talks between Iran and the P5+1. Moreover, there is evidence that shows 15 of the 19 terrorists who carried out the attacks in September 11, 2001 were Saudi nationals but at that time the mainstream media was tasked with pointing the finger at other countries.

The US Senate issued a report on terrorist attacks on the twin towers in 2002, but in a historical cover-up, then President George W Bush prevented 28 pages of it from going public. More than a decade later, the senators are admitting those pages explained how a number of wealthy and powerful Saudis gave financial backing to the terrorists who perpetrated 9/11. But it looks like Saudi petro-dollars are once again saving the day for the Kingdom: the US President has threatened to veto the senate bill for fear of Saudi Arabia selling up to 750 billion dollars in treasury securities and other assets in the United States if the bill passes.   

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