Wed Mar 16, 2016 07:26AM
An unnamed supporter of the Central African Republic’s new president, Faustin-Archange Touadera, shows a campaign flyer picturing the president as he celebrates his victory on the streets of Bangui, February 20, 2016. (Photo by AFP)
An unnamed supporter of the Central African Republic’s new president, Faustin-Archange Touadera, shows a campaign flyer picturing the president as he celebrates his victory on the streets of Bangui, February 20, 2016. (Photo by AFP)
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The recent violence in the Central African Republic (CAR) was not altogether surprising. Tensions have been simmering in the war-ravished nation for the past three years.

Whilst this latest round of attacks did not appear directly connected to the political, communal and religious killings involving militia groups that have periodically flared up since 2013, it remains troubling.

Since violence flared in the CAR, the country has been effectively torn apart. Thousands have been killed, many forced to flee their homes and left the northern half of the country effectively partitioned.

Bambari saw numerous attacks last year despite the presence of United Nations peacekeepers.

The UN designated the city a weapons-free zone last September, but the Seleka rebels and the anti-Balaka militia continue their armed presence in the town.

Can President Touadera’s pledge to bring peace to the Central African Republic hold up under the weight of so many apparent obstacles?