Sat Feb 13, 2016 9:22AM
Women watch as US President Barack Obama speaks at the Islamic Society of Baltimore, in Windsor Mill, Maryland on February 3, 2016. (AFP Photo)
Women watch as US President Barack Obama speaks at the Islamic Society of Baltimore, in Windsor Mill, Maryland on February 3, 2016. (AFP Photo)
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The Muslim community is at the forefront of public debate, not only as a result of the post-Paris attacks, but more so because of questions related to Islam and its convergence with a democratic, pluralistic society.

Whereas some are sincerely and seriously engaged in critical debates that avoid stereotypical generalizations, others fuel the somewhat paranoid attitudes toward Islam and Muslims.

The narrative of the political establishment of the West towards Muslims is a racist one albeit on occasions thinly disguised although that veneer usually slips.

There should be no more expectation on Muslims to condemn any crime than there is on their white counterparts.

The challenge of disunity needs to be addressed because that is part of the mechanism of the strength of the Western political establishment.