Wed Jan 27, 2016 6:41AM
Rescue workers carry a body from the Splendid Hotel in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, January 16, 2016. (Photo by AP)
Rescue workers carry a body from the Splendid Hotel in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, January 16, 2016. (Photo by AP)
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The deadly assault scenes that recently played out in Burkino Faso stunned the poor yet normally calm West African nation.

A 12-hour stand-off between troops supported by French forces on the one side and Takfiri militants on the other resulted in multiple deaths.

The al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb militant group claimed responsibility for the attack, saying that the gunmen were from the al-Murabitoun group, which is led by Algerian militant Mokhtar Belmokhtar. They stormed the 147-room Splendid Hotel, frequented by foreigners and United Nations staff, taking over a hundred people hostage.

Burkina Faso’s President Roch Marc Christian Kabore declared three days of national mourning and said the country would ‘emerge victorious.’ But just how true are these sentiments? Have leaders in some African countries failed to grasp the full extent of the Takfiri threat and are they now paying the price?