Fri Jan 15, 2016 6:40PM
The GOP debate is a “revelation of a deeply racist and fundamentally, morally and spiritually bankrupt culture and increasingly an economic bankrupt one,” Daniel Patrick Welch told Press TV on Friday.
The GOP debate is a “revelation of a deeply racist and fundamentally, morally and spiritually bankrupt culture and increasingly an economic bankrupt one,” Daniel Patrick Welch told Press TV on Friday.
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The latest US Republican presidential debate resembled a “freak show” that exposes the country’s profoundly racist and morally bankrupt culture, says an American political commentator.

The GOP debate is a “revelation of a deeply racist and fundamentally, morally and spiritually bankrupt culture and increasingly an economic bankrupt one,” Daniel Patrick Welch told Press TV on Friday.

“Sometimes I think that the GOP debates exist solely as a warning to the rest of the world so that they can gain this kind of Orwellian insight into just how crazy Americans can be,” Welch said.

“It’s like a revolving freak show and I imagine that foreigners are completely horrified at watching it,” he added.

The US presidential debates are held among candidates of both major political parties in the campaign for the nomination for US president.

The sixth Republican debate held on Thursday in North Charleston, South Carolina, was filled with testy exchanges between the seven candidates on stage.

GOP presidential front-runner Donald Trump and top challenger Ted Cruz have clashed during the 2.5-hour debate in their sharpest and most personal encounters of the presidential race.

Trump, a billionaire from New York, and Cruz, a senator from Texas, ended a longstanding truce in spectacular fashion.

Until the latest debate, Trump and Cruz had been friendly because they have both been seeking to appeal to conservatives in the Tea Party movement and did not want to anger them.

"I guess the bromance is over," Trump told CNN after the debate.

Trump also reiterated his anti-Muslim stance despite facing criticism at home and abroad. His presidential campaign has been marked by controversial statements directed against immigrants, refugees and Muslims.

US Senator Marco Rubio of Florida turned in a contentious performance with attacks on Cruz and New Jersey Governor Chris Christie.

Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, quiet during most of the debate, presented himself as a voice of reason against Trump.

A RealClearPolitics daily average national poll on January 15 showed Trump had 34.5 percent of the vote, Cruz 19.3 percent, Rubio 11.8 percent, Carson 9.0 percent, Bush 4.8 percent, while 3.5 percent favored Christie.