Wed Nov 11, 2015 9:32AM
South Sudanese soldiers are pictured in Pageri in Eastern Equatoria State, South Sudan, August 20, 2015. (Photo by AFP)
South Sudanese soldiers are pictured in Pageri in Eastern Equatoria State, South Sudan, August 20, 2015. (Photo by AFP)
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An attempted coup by Riek Machar led to Salva Kiir’s tribal militia turning on the Nuer population in what became known as the Juba massacre, an onslaught that made many extinct.

This initial massacre, which lasted for months, set off a retaliatory civil war that both sides are currently battling to end. The UN Security Council blacklisted six rival generals in South Sudan in July; the first people to be subjected to a global asset freeze and travel ban. Russia, Angola and Venezuela objected in September to a US bid to add South Sudan’s army chief and a rebel commander to the sanctions lists.

More alarmingly, latest reports talk of both sides stockpiling weapons in violation of the August peace agreement. What are the roots of the current 22-month conflict in South Sudan and what role are outside players having in the situation? It is reported that external donors helped Reik Machar in his fight against Salva Kiir. With South Sudanese people losing their lives on a daily basis, Africa Today asks: are there any winners if South Sudan continues to fail?