Sat Oct 17, 2015 9:56AM
Opposition Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn speaks at an anti-austerity rally at the cathedral in Manchester, north west England, on October 5, 2015, on the sidelines of the annual ruling Conservative party conference. (AFP)
Opposition Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn speaks at an anti-austerity rally at the cathedral in Manchester, north west England, on October 5, 2015, on the sidelines of the annual ruling Conservative party conference. (AFP)

Pro-Palestinian Jeremy Corbyn has become the new leader of Britain’s second biggest political force, the Labour Party.

Corbyn has spoken out in support of Palestinian rights throughout his political career. He has also visited the suffering people of Palestine on numerous occasions. For example, he has often demonstrated against Israel’s wars on the Palestinian people.

And he has called for an economic boycott against the Zionist entity. But that was while he was a backbencher on the political sidelines and with little power.

Now he is the leader of the second biggest political party in the country and with a real shot of becoming prime minister in five years time.

When it comes to Palestine, there has been little to choose between Labour and the Conservatives, with both following a pro-Israel line for decades or more. But now that Corbyn is Labour leader, there is at last clear blue water between the major parties on this issue.

But what implications does this have for British foreign policy and the Palestinian cause?