Fri Jul 17, 2015 9:11AM
EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini (L) and Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif attend a final press conference of Iran nuclear talks in Vienna, Austria on July 14, 2015. (AFP Photo)
EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini (L) and Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif attend a final press conference of Iran nuclear talks in Vienna, Austria on July 14, 2015. (AFP Photo)

Earlier this week, Iran and the P5+1 group of world powers concluded talks on Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) , which will put limits on Iran’s nuclear program in exchange for the removal of sanctions against the Islamic Republic.

The conclusion will, according to Iranian officials, be presented to the United Nations Security Council (UNSC), which will adopt a resolution in seven to 10 days making the JCPOA an official document.

The UNSC sanctions against the Islamic Republic, including all economic and financial bans, will be lifted at once under a mutually agreed framework and through a new UN resolution.

The nuclear-related economic and financial restrictions imposed by the United States and the EU targeting the Iranian banking, financial, oil, gas, petrochemical, trade, insurance and transport sectors will at once be annulled with the beginning of the implementation of the agreement.

In this edition of Comment, we ask: Why has the West really been sanctioning Iran?