Wed Jul 1, 2015 6:9AM
Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir arrives in Khartoum from Johannesburg after a court ordered him not to leave South Africa, June 15, 2015. (© AFP)
Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir arrives in Khartoum from Johannesburg after a court ordered him not to leave South Africa, June 15, 2015. (© AFP)
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As the only head of state wanted by the International Criminal Court on genocide charges, President Omar Hassan al-Bashir of Sudan has spent years looking over his shoulder. He avoided countries where the risk of arrest seemed high. He visited friendly African nations hostile to the court, though he sometimes quickly left for home when the ground seemed to shift.

Recently, Mr. Bashir found himself unable to leave South Africa, which he was visiting to attend an African Union (AU) summit meeting in Johannesburg. A South African High Court ordered the government to prevent Mr. Bashir from departing until it issues a ruling on whether the government is required to arrest him and hand him over to the international court.

Africa Today asks whether this will push the AU to finally establish a trustworthy African criminal court so that Africa can hold leaders who commit crimes accountable.