Wed May 6, 2015 4:57AM
A demonstrator holds a banner in Johannesburg during a march gathering several thousands of people to protest against the recent wave of xenophobic attacks in South Africa, April 23, 2015. (© AFP)
A demonstrator holds a banner in Johannesburg during a march gathering several thousands of people to protest against the recent wave of xenophobic attacks in South Africa, April 23, 2015. (© AFP)
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In South Africa, more than 2,000 people have fled to makeshift camps and police stations. They are immigrants living in fear after a recent wave of violent attacks. The immigrants are accused of taking South African jobs. At least five people have been killed after looters attacked immigrant shopkeepers.

The complaint has been that these foreign nationals basically have the monopoly of the business in the area and that they employ their own brothers, sisters and family members from wherever it is that they come from. And so, they, in that sense, take jobs from the people. But is that really the case?

In the aftermath of the recent xenophobic attacks in South Africa, President Zuma has appointed a ministerial committee of 14 to look into the issue of managing South Africa’s migration. He also stands accused of not doing enough to protect fellow Africans living in his country. Violence has left thousands displaced, and 7 people are reported dead.

The attacks were sparked by comments made by the respected Zulu King Goodwill Zwelithini. The denigration of foreigners is nothing new in South African culture and there seem to be very little being done to integrate fellow Africans into the South African culture.

Recent peace marches across the country highlight the desire of the majority of South Africans, but what can the ANC deliver? The regressing economic growth has intensified this ticking time-bomb.

There was a string of attacks against foreigners in 2008 near Johannesburg during another financial crisis, which left 60 dead. As Zuma appeals to the leaders of the nations affected, Africa Today examines what South Africa needs to do to heal and build a true rainbow nation.